2016 MOSAIIC Conference

April 6-8, 2016 | MOSAIIC Conference: Dialogue on Race and Education in the 21st Century | Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education, Berea College, CPO 2106, Berea, KY 40404 

Register Here

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6  A MOSAIIC Afternoon

7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.          Conference Registration
Location:  Carter G. Woodson Center Lobby, Alumni Building       

8:30 a.m.   Welcome     Location: Phelps-Stokes Auditorium
  • Dr. Alicestyne Turley, Director Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education and Central KY Diversity Consortium founder/ institutional representative/MOSAIIC member 
  • Dr. Lyle Roelofs, President Berea College 
  • Mayor Steven Connelly 
  • Others
OPENING PLENARY – KEYNOTE
bell hooks -
A Conversation on Race and Education in the 21st Century
Phelps-Stokes – Free Campus Admission


Morning Sessions            Session 1: A Conversation on Race – Is Anyone
10:30–11:45                     Listening?



12:00-1:00 p.m.                 LUNCH... Woods-Penn
Central KY Diversity Consortium Presents MOSAIIC Afternoon
Welcome: Charlene Walker VP Multiculturalism and Inclusion and founder of Central Kentucky Diversity Consortium
  • Introduction of CKYDC members
  • Presentation of 2016 MOSAIIC winners

1:15-2:30 p.m.                   Keynote Address: Peggy McIntosh
Location:  Baird Lounge, Alumni Building - Free Campus Admission


2:45-4:30 p.m.                   Session 2: Conversations on Race

Panel 106:  Classroom, Campus, and Community: Intersections for Race, Social Justice, and Education
Moderator: Charlene Walker, BCTC VP Multiculturalism & Inclusion and Central KY Diversity Consortium and MOSAIIC founder/ institutional representative
Location: Carter G. Woodson Center Gallery, Alumni Building

As a Catholic/Jesuit institution with an urban campus, in a city widely known for its racial tensions and disparities, Saint Louis University’s commitment to social justice work is an explicit aspect of our institutional mission, identity, and history. In 1944, SLU was the first university in Missouri to formally admit African-American students; leadership at that time intentionally sought to right the institutional wrong of segregation within local Catholic institutions. However, like so many other campuses, ours has struggled to enact this commitment consistently, both on and off campus. Sometimes, we simply fail to examine our own actions in ways that align with our intentions; other times, people of good will simply aren’t sure when, whether, how to act on our convictions. In the aftermath of the 2014 killing of Michael Brown at the hands of a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, and the shooting of another young man of color – Vonderrit Myers, Jr., son of a long-time SLU employee – by a police officer within two miles of the University, the movement came directly to our doorstep: protesters (both students and not) camped out at the clock tower in the center of our campus, and Occupy SLU was born.

Throughout this experience, faculty, staff, and students acted in dialogue, debate, and protest, through affection and hate speech and compassion and commitment. The campus was challenged to confront significant questions that should prick the conscience of all institutions of higher education in the 21st Century: What is the role of a university in forming women and men who can enact social change and social justice commitments with their whole selves? And how do we act – toward one another, both in and out of the classroom; in solidarity with and for others beyond our campus gates; in regional and national advocacy that can lead to meaningful systemic change?

Panelists:
Colleen McCluskey, PhD
, is associate professor of philosophy at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri.  She specializes in medieval philosophy and feminist philosophy. Her teaching interests also include ethics, logic, and philosophy of race. She is currently working on a book focusing on Thomas Aquinas's account of moral wrongdoing.

Kira Hudson Banks, PhD
is associate professor of psychology at Saint Louis University. Her research focuses primarily on race and racial identity; discrimination and mental health; and diversity and inclusion. Her teaching interests include human diversity, abnormal psychology, and human services practicum. In the fall of 2014, she was involved with Teaching Ferguson events in the St. Louis area, and since then, she has also served as a consultant for the Ferguson Commission.

Debra Rudder Lohe, PhD is director of the Reinert Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning at Saint Louis University. In this role, she creates and leads faculty development programs on evidence-based approaches to course/curriculum design, instructional methods, and student engagement; on creating innovative and inclusive learning spaces; and on designing transformational learning experiences (including community-based and service learning).

  Click here for Full Conference Schedule

Dialogue on Race and Education in the

21st Century

MOSAIIC

Photo of Culture

Definition

Something consisting of a variety of components: something consisting of a number of things of different types, form or colors.

The Purpose

The Bluegrass Community and Technical College Office of Multiculturalism and Inclusion in efforts to raise awareness of opportunities and strategies needed to promote inclusive working and learning environments invite your participation in a conference agenda highlighting the following subjects; Implementation of institutional change, understanding organization structure and power structure, benefits of going beyond compliance, confronting fundamentalism, disseminating information without offending and much more needed information and dialogue.

This conference is a must for educators, administrators and all persons interested in making organizational inclusion a priority in their workplace.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6  A MOSAIIC Afternoon

7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.          Conference Registration

Location:  Carter G. Woodson Center Lobby, Alumni Building       

8:30 a.m.   Welcome     Location: Phelps-Stokes Auditorium

Dr. Alicestyne Turley, Director Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education and Central KY Diversity Consortium founder/ institutional representative/MOSAIIC member 

Dr. Lyle Roelofs, President Berea College 

Mayor Steven Connelly 

Others

                                                OPENING PLENARY – KEYNOTE

bell hooks - A Conversation on Race and Education in the 21st Century

Phelps-Stokes – Free Campus Admission

bell hooks, PhD, is an acclaimed intellectual, feminist theorist, cultural critic, artist, and writer. hooks has authored over three dozen books and has published works that span several genres, including cultural criticism, personal memoirs, poetry collections, and children's books. Her writings cover topics of gender, race, class, spirituality, teaching, and the significance of media in contemporary culture. Berea College is a proud partner with Dr. hooks, the Distinguished Professor in Residence in Appalachian Studies, who has not only chosen to make her home here in Berea, Kentucky, she also opened the bell hooks Institute (bhI) adjacent to the campus.

Born Gloria Jean Watkins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, bell hooks adopted the pen name of her maternal great-grandmother, a woman known for speaking her mind. hooks received her B.A. from Stanford University, her M.A. from the University of Wisconsin and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her books include, Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism, Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem, Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom, Feminism Is for Everybody: Passionate Politics, Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope, Where We Stand: Class Matters, and We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity. dr. hooks founded the bell hooks institute in Berea in 2014. The bell hooks Institute documents her life and work as an acclaimed intellectual, feminist theorist, cultural critic, artist, and writer. The institute strives to promote the cause of ending domination through understanding the ways systems of exploitation and oppression intersect through critical thinking, teaching, events, and conversations. The institute houses artifacts, original artworks, and a collection of contemporary African American art and is located at 301 Jackson Street in Berea. The Institute brings critical thinkers, artists, and writers from all over the nation to the Berea campus to be in conversation. Most events are open to the public, although some are invitation only due events due to limited seating. Everyone is welcome to visit the Institute; please visit the institute website at http://www.bellhooksinstitute.com for specific information.

Morning Sessions             Session 1: A Conversation on Race – Is Anyone

10:30–11:45                       Listening?


12:00-1:00 p.m.                 LUNCH... Woods-Penn

Central KY Diversity Consortium Presents MOSAIIC Afternoon

Welcome: Charlene Walker VP Multiculturalism and Inclusion and founder of Central Kentucky Diversity Consortium

Introduction of CKYDC members

Presentation of 2016 MOSAIIC winners


1:15-2:30 p.m.                   Keynote Address: Peggy McIntosh

Location:  Baird Lounge, Alumni Building - Free Campus Admission

Peggy McIntosh, PhD, is Associate Director of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.  She is Founder and Co-director of the United States S.E.E.D. Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity).  She consults widely in the United States and throughout the world with college and school faculty who are creating more gender-fair and multicultural curricula.  In 1988, she published the ground-breaking article, “White Privilege and Male Privilege:  A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences through Work on Women’s Studies.”  This analysis and its shorter form, “White Privilege:  Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack,” 1989, have been instrumental in putting the dimension of privilege into discussions of gender, race, and sexuality in the United States.  McIntosh has taught at the Brearley School, Harvard University, Trinity College (Washington, D.C.), the University of Denver, the University of Durham (England), and Wellesley College.  She is co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Women’s Institute and has been consulting editor the Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women.  She has consulted with women on 22 Asian campuses on the development of Women’s Studies, and programs to bring materials from Women’s Studies into the main curriculum.  She has consulted frequently in China and Korea.  In addition to having two honorary degrees, she is the recipient of the Klingenstein Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership from Columbia Teachers College.


2:45-4:30 p.m.                   Session 2: Conversations on Race

Panel 106:  Classroom, Campus, and Community: Intersections for Race, Social Justice, and Education

Moderator: Charlene Walker, BCTC VP Multiculturalism & Inclusion and Central KY Diversity Consortium and MOSAIIC founder/ institutional representative

Location:                                             Carter G. Woodson Center Gallery, Alumni Building

As a Catholic/Jesuit institution with an urban campus, in a city widely known for its racial tensions and disparities, Saint Louis University’s commitment to social justice work is an explicit aspect of our institutional mission, identity, and history. In 1944, SLU was the first university in Missouri to formally admit African-American students; leadership at that time intentionally sought to right the institutional wrong of segregation within local Catholic institutions. However, like so many other campuses, ours has struggled to enact this commitment consistently, both on and off campus. Sometimes, we simply fail to examine our own actions in ways that align with our intentions; other times, people of good will simply aren’t sure when, whether, how to act on our convictions. In the aftermath of the 2014 killing of Michael Brown at the hands of a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, and the shooting of another young man of color – Vonderrit Myers, Jr., son of a long-time SLU employee – by a police officer within two miles of the University, the movement came directly to our doorstep: protesters (both students and not) camped out at the clock tower in the center of our campus, and Occupy SLU was born.

Throughout this experience, faculty, staff, and students acted in dialogue, debate, and protest, through affection and hate speech and compassion and commitment. The campus was challenged to confront significant questions that should prick the conscience of all institutions of higher education in the 21st Century: What is the role of a university in forming women and men who can enact social change and social justice commitments with their whole selves? And how do we act – toward one another, both in and out of the classroom; in solidarity with and for others beyond our campus gates; in regional and national advocacy that can lead to meaningful systemic change?

Panelists:

Colleen McCluskey, PhD, is associate professor of philosophy at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri.  She specializes in medieval philosophy and feminist philosophy. Her teaching interests also include ethics, logic, and philosophy of race. She is currently working on a book focusing on Thomas Aquinas's account of moral wrongdoing.

Kira Hudson Banks, PhD is associate professor of psychology at Saint Louis University. Her research focuses primarily on race and racial identity; discrimination and mental health; and diversity and inclusion. Her teaching interests include human diversity, abnormal psychology, and human services practicum. In the fall of 2014, she was involved with Teaching Ferguson events in the St. Louis area, and since then, she has also served as a consultant for the Ferguson Commission.

Debra Rudder Lohe, PhD is director of the Reinert Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning at Saint Louis University. In this role, she creates and leads faculty development programs on evidence-based approaches to course/curriculum design, instructional methods, and student engagement; on creating innovative and inclusive learning spaces; and on designing transformational learning experiences (including community-based and service learning). 

Dialogue on Race and Education in the

21st Century

MOSAIIC

Photo of Culture

Definition

Something consisting of a variety of components: something consisting of a number of things of different types, form or colors.

The Purpose

The Bluegrass Community and Technical College Office of Multiculturalism and Inclusion in efforts to raise awareness of opportunities and strategies needed to promote inclusive working and learning environments invite your participation in a conference agenda highlighting the following subjects; Implementation of institutional change, understanding organization structure and power structure, benefits of going beyond compliance, confronting fundamentalism, disseminating information without offending and much more needed information and dialogue.

This conference is a must for educators, administrators and all persons interested in making organizational inclusion a priority in their workplace.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6  A MOSAIIC Afternoon

7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.          Conference Registration

Location:  Carter G. Woodson Center Lobby, Alumni Building       

8:30 a.m.   Welcome     Location: Phelps-Stokes Auditorium

Dr. Alicestyne Turley, Director Carter G. Woodson Center for Interracial Education and Central KY Diversity Consortium founder/ institutional representative/MOSAIIC member 

Dr. Lyle Roelofs, President Berea College 

Mayor Steven Connelly 

Others

                                                OPENING PLENARY – KEYNOTE

bell hooks - A Conversation on Race and Education in the 21st Century

Phelps-Stokes – Free Campus Admission

bell hooks, PhD, is an acclaimed intellectual, feminist theorist, cultural critic, artist, and writer. hooks has authored over three dozen books and has published works that span several genres, including cultural criticism, personal memoirs, poetry collections, and children's books. Her writings cover topics of gender, race, class, spirituality, teaching, and the significance of media in contemporary culture. Berea College is a proud partner with Dr. hooks, the Distinguished Professor in Residence in Appalachian Studies, who has not only chosen to make her home here in Berea, Kentucky, she also opened the bell hooks Institute (bhI) adjacent to the campus.

Born Gloria Jean Watkins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, bell hooks adopted the pen name of her maternal great-grandmother, a woman known for speaking her mind. hooks received her B.A. from Stanford University, her M.A. from the University of Wisconsin and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her books include, Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism, Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem, Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom, Feminism Is for Everybody: Passionate Politics, Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope, Where We Stand: Class Matters, and We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity. dr. hooks founded the bell hooks institute in Berea in 2014. The bell hooks Institute documents her life and work as an acclaimed intellectual, feminist theorist, cultural critic, artist, and writer. The institute strives to promote the cause of ending domination through understanding the ways systems of exploitation and oppression intersect through critical thinking, teaching, events, and conversations. The institute houses artifacts, original artworks, and a collection of contemporary African American art and is located at 301 Jackson Street in Berea. The Institute brings critical thinkers, artists, and writers from all over the nation to the Berea campus to be in conversation. Most events are open to the public, although some are invitation only due events due to limited seating. Everyone is welcome to visit the Institute; please visit the institute website at http://www.bellhooksinstitute.com for specific information.

Morning Sessions             Session 1: A Conversation on Race – Is Anyone

10:30–11:45                       Listening?


12:00-1:00 p.m.                 LUNCH... Woods-Penn

Central KY Diversity Consortium Presents MOSAIIC Afternoon

Welcome: Charlene Walker VP Multiculturalism and Inclusion and founder of Central Kentucky Diversity Consortium

Introduction of CKYDC members

Presentation of 2016 MOSAIIC winners


1:15-2:30 p.m.                   Keynote Address: Peggy McIntosh

Location:  Baird Lounge, Alumni Building - Free Campus Admission

Peggy McIntosh, PhD, is Associate Director of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.  She is Founder and Co-director of the United States S.E.E.D. Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity).  She consults widely in the United States and throughout the world with college and school faculty who are creating more gender-fair and multicultural curricula.  In 1988, she published the ground-breaking article, “White Privilege and Male Privilege:  A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences through Work on Women’s Studies.”  This analysis and its shorter form, “White Privilege:  Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack,” 1989, have been instrumental in putting the dimension of privilege into discussions of gender, race, and sexuality in the United States.  McIntosh has taught at the Brearley School, Harvard University, Trinity College (Washington, D.C.), the University of Denver, the University of Durham (England), and Wellesley College.  She is co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Women’s Institute and has been consulting editor the Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women.  She has consulted with women on 22 Asian campuses on the development of Women’s Studies, and programs to bring materials from Women’s Studies into the main curriculum.  She has consulted frequently in China and Korea.  In addition to having two honorary degrees, she is the recipient of the Klingenstein Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership from Columbia Teachers College.


2:45-4:30 p.m.                   Session 2: Conversations on Race

Panel 106:  Classroom, Campus, and Community: Intersections for Race, Social Justice, and Education

Moderator: Charlene Walker, BCTC VP Multiculturalism & Inclusion and Central KY Diversity Consortium and MOSAIIC founder/ institutional representative

Location:                                             Carter G. Woodson Center Gallery, Alumni Building

As a Catholic/Jesuit institution with an urban campus, in a city widely known for its racial tensions and disparities, Saint Louis University’s commitment to social justice work is an explicit aspect of our institutional mission, identity, and history. In 1944, SLU was the first university in Missouri to formally admit African-American students; leadership at that time intentionally sought to right the institutional wrong of segregation within local Catholic institutions. However, like so many other campuses, ours has struggled to enact this commitment consistently, both on and off campus. Sometimes, we simply fail to examine our own actions in ways that align with our intentions; other times, people of good will simply aren’t sure when, whether, how to act on our convictions. In the aftermath of the 2014 killing of Michael Brown at the hands of a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, and the shooting of another young man of color – Vonderrit Myers, Jr., son of a long-time SLU employee – by a police officer within two miles of the University, the movement came directly to our doorstep: protesters (both students and not) camped out at the clock tower in the center of our campus, and Occupy SLU was born.

Throughout this experience, faculty, staff, and students acted in dialogue, debate, and protest, through affection and hate speech and compassion and commitment. The campus was challenged to confront significant questions that should prick the conscience of all institutions of higher education in the 21st Century: What is the role of a university in forming women and men who can enact social change and social justice commitments with their whole selves? And how do we act – toward one another, both in and out of the classroom; in solidarity with and for others beyond our campus gates; in regional and national advocacy that can lead to meaningful systemic change?

Panelists:

Colleen McCluskey, PhD, is associate professor of philosophy at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri.  She specializes in medieval philosophy and feminist philosophy. Her teaching interests also include ethics, logic, and philosophy of race. She is currently working on a book focusing on Thomas Aquinas's account of moral wrongdoing.

Kira Hudson Banks, PhD is associate professor of psychology at Saint Louis University. Her research focuses primarily on race and racial identity; discrimination and mental health; and diversity and inclusion. Her teaching interests include human diversity, abnormal psychology, and human services practicum. In the fall of 2014, she was involved with Teaching Ferguson events in the St. Louis area, and since then, she has also served as a consultant for the Ferguson Commission.

Debra Rudder Lohe, PhD is director of the Reinert Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning at Saint Louis University. In this role, she creates and leads faculty development programs on evidence-based approaches to course/curriculum design, instructional methods, and student engagement; on creating innovative and inclusive learning spaces; and on designing transformational learning experiences (including community-based and service learning).